Kenyans are counting hours till the expiration of the current curfew and cessation of movement.

The nationwide dusk to dawn curfew was declared by the head of state on March 26 and effected on March 27.

Cessation of movement in the Nairobi metropolitan area, counties of Mombasa, Kilifi, Mandera and Kwale remain effective till June 6.

These were measures undertaken by the government and Ministry of Health to curb the spread of COVID-19 in the country.

June 6, the day that is trending more than any holiday is when Kenyans are expecting to resume some of their old habits.

The drunk want to get back to their joints. In fact, they are claiming that this time they will be in diapers to avoid wasting the drinking time.

The husbands are dying to avoid their wives for a few more hours.

The prayers of many parents might just be getting and answer soon. “The children are driving us insane,” they say.

However, as the day draws closer, so are the expectations. With that said, are Kenyans ready to accept the double-sided news? Rude shock or “celebration.”

Speaking at the virtual Madaraka Day national address on Monday, President Uhuru declined to hint on anything that concerns the events on June 6. This is regardless of the high hope from the citizens.

As the COVID-19 infections hit 2,340 with a total of 78 fatalities, 592 patients have recovered and been discharged so far.

What should Kenyans really expect on June 6? Do these statistics send a different message?